Gluten Free Red Velvet Cupcakes

Today I’m going to share with you a recipe for one of my favourite bakes – Gluten Free Red Velvet Cupcakes.

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My love affair with Red Velvet Cake started a few years ago when my little sister asked me to make a Red Velvet Cake for her Birthday. I had never eaten or made Red Velvet Cake before, but I was nevertheless happy to oblige – my Mum was less happy when my first attempt erupted all over the oven because I’d used shallow tins and too much bicarbonate of soda… sorry Mum!

It wasn’t until my first taste of Red Velvet Cake I realised what I had been missing – Chocolate sponge flavoured with sharp buttermilk, topped off with cream cheese frosting. What’s not to like?

Making a Red Velvet Cake can be quite time consuming, especially if you are going for the traditional three or more layers, so I’ve adapted my Red Velvet Cake recipe to a more simple cupcake recipe, so that you can get your Red Velvet fix much quicker!

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Gluten Free Red Velvet Cupcakes

Ingredients

For the Cupcakes:
100g gluten free self raising flour
10g cocoa powder
100g caster sugar
50g butter
1 large egg
100ml buttermilk
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp red food colouring (gel not liquid)
1/2 tsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

For the Cream Cheese Topping:
250g mascarpone cheese
150ml double cream
50g icing sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

To Decorate:
Freeze dried raspberry pieces

Method

1) Preheat the oven to 170 degrees C (Gas Mark 3) and a cupcake tray with cupcake cases.

2) In a large bowl sieve together the flour and cocoa powder, then set aside for later.

3) In a separate bowl cream the butter, vanilla extract and sugar together with an electric hand mixer until light and fluffy.

4) Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a spatula. With the mixer on a low speed, add the egg a bit at a time along with a tablespoon of the flour mixture. Once the egg is fully combined, add the rest of the flour.

5) Pour your buttermilk into a measuring jug, then add the red food colouring a little at a time until it turns a turns a deep red –  I found about half a teaspoon did the trick, but you may find you need more or less depending on the food colouring you are using.

6) With the mixture on a low speed, add the buttermilk to your cake mixture a bit at a time, keep mixing until all the buttermilk is combined.

7) In a small bowl mix together the bicarbonate of soda and vinegar until it starts to fizz, then quickly fold it into the cake mixture.

8) Working quickly, spoon two teaspoons of the mixture into each cupcake case

9) Bake for 15 – 18 minutes. The cupcakes are ready when they are firm to touch.

10) Leave the cupcakes to cool in the tin for a few minutes, then transfer them to a wire rack to finish cooling while you prepare the cream cheese topping.

11) Sift the icing sugar into a large bowl, add the vanilla extract and mascarpone then mix with a wooden spoon until the ingredients are just combined.

12) In a separate bowl whisk the double cream with an electric hand mixer until it almost reaches soft peaks, add the mascarpone and whisk for a couple of seconds until it is just combined.

13) Transfer the frosting into a piping bag fitted with a large star nozzle. Pipe the frosting onto each cupcake, then decorate with a sprinkling of freeze dried raspberry pieces.

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If you give this recipe a try, or any of the other recipes on my blog remember to take a snap of your creation and share it with me on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter using the hashtag #titchytonbakes.

Gluten Free Christmas: Kransekake Recipe

For me, every Christmas table should have a showstopper, something extra special which makes the family go “Wow!”

I don’t know about you, but I don’t think there is anything more show stopping than the towering Kransekake Cake which would look simply spectacular at the centre of any Christmas dinner table!
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The Kransekake is a traditional Scandinavian cake which is often served at special occasions including weddings and Christmas celebrations. It consists of 18 almond flavoured rings which are stacked on top of each other to form an impressive tower – If you’re a Marzipan fan, you’ll love this cake!

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My Kransekake Design

Although it looks very impressive, it’s actually quite straight forward to make! The rings are made from a dough consisting of ground almonds, icing sugar and egg whites which is shaped to fit Kransekake moulds which can be found at Lakeland.

Kransekake Cakes are usually gluten free, although dough is sometimes rolled out in Semolina flour which is not suitable for Coeliacs. For my Kransekake cake, I rolled the dough out in Cornflour instead of Semolina.
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Gluten Free Kransekake Recipe

Recipe inspired by Paul Hollywood’s Recipe from ‘The Great British Bake Off’

Ingredients
500g ground almonds, plus cornflour for dusting
500g icing sugar
4 egg whites
1 tsp almond extract
sunflower oil spray

For the Decoration:
2 egg white
500g icing sugar
edible spray glitter
fondant stars (optional)

You will also need 6 Kransekake Moulds (I bought mine from Lakeland)

Method

1. In a large bowl mix together the ground almonds and icing sugar.

2. Add the egg whites and almond extract, then using your hands work the ingredients into a smooth ball of slightly sticky dough.

3. Chill the dough in the fridge for at least two hours.

4. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C/Gas Mark 6.

5. Spray the Kransekake moulds with oil and dust them generously with cornflour.

6. Dust a work surface with cornflour and split the dough into 6 equally sized pieces.

7. Split one of the pieces of dough into three different sized pieces: one large, one medium and one small.

8. Roll the balls of dough out into pieces which are approximately a finger-width and long enough to wrap round the Kransekake moulds.

9. Place the first piece into the Kransekake mould and pinch the ends together. Repeat with all the other pieces until all the moulds are filled.

10. Place the moulds onto a baking tray and bake for 10 minutes or until golden brown.

11. Remove the Kransekake rings from the oven and allow them to set in their moulds – if you try to remove them while they are warm they will break! Once the Kransekake are cool remove them from their moulds and set them aside while you make the icing.

12. To make the Royal Icing, place the egg whites in a bowl and slowly sift in the icing sugar in batches. In between each batch of sugar stir the icing with a wooden spoon or a balloon whisk until the icing thickens up.

13. Spoon the icing into a piping bag fitted with a small round writing nozzle.

14. Before you begin to decorate, sort the rings out into size order.

15. Place the largest ring onto your serving plate (you could use a bit of icing to adhere it to the plate and stop it from slipping around). Pipe a zig-zag pattern onto the ring and place the second largest ring on top. Repeat until all the rings have been neatly stacked.

16. To finish, spray the Kransekake with edible spray glitter. I made mine extra special by covering it in gold stars made from fondant icing.

I hope you all enjoy the Christmas season and have a go at my Christmas recipes this year, which also include my Gluten Free Gingerbread Cookies which I posted last Christmas, my Hazelnut Cranberry and Orange Biscotti and my Cointreau Christmas Cake.
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I am taking a well deserved Christmas break, but I will be back in the New Year with plenty more gluten free recipes for you all to try.  In the meantime, why not check out my out my Instagram page or my Facebook page to see what else I get up to over Christmas!

Wishing you all a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!  xxx

Silly Yak ‘Ready to Roll Pastry Block’ Review

Today I’m going to share with you my thoughts on a relatively new product available for all you Coeliacs out there: Silly Yak’s ‘Gluten Free Ready to Roll Pastry Block’.

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There has been lots of excitement growing around this product on Facebook and I can see why, as it is very difficult and time consuming to make decent gluten free pastry from scratch, so for many Coeliacs ready to roll gluten free pastry would be an absolute godsend.

At the moment this product is only stocked in selected Tesco stores and they only seem to stock it in quite small quantities, which is a bit of a shame. After a few months of searching I found Silly Yak’s list of stockists and went on a bit of a trek across London to get my hands on some.

The product can be found in the chilled foods section amongst all the normal ready to roll pastries and is not a frozen product. Sadly, it can’t be frozen so you would need to use it by it’s use by date, but you can freeze whatever you decide to make with it. I was happy to see that the pastry only costs £1.75, which I think is reasonable compared to a lot of gluten free products on the market and it is only fractionally more expensive than a lot of normal ready to roll pastries available.

I bought two packets so that I could give a few different recipes a try and attempt things that are impossible to make with homemade gluten free pastry, such as Cornish Pasties.

Initially, I was very frustrated as I found the pastry very difficult to work with.
I rolled out the pastry between two sheets of floured greaseproof paper, as gluten free pastry has a tendency to stick to the work surface, but found that it melted and stuck to the paper a bit once it had been at room temperature for a while. After cutting out the first few shapes, I attempted to to re-roll the leftover scraps of pastry but they ended up melting completely. I also had a bit of trouble rolling out the pastry thin enough and ended up with a few holes in the pastry when trying to arrange it into the right shape, but after a little bit of effort I did manage to make a few decent looking Cornish Pasties.

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After the slight debacle of assembling the pasties I’ll admit I was feeling a little sceptical, but once they came out of the oven I was much more excited to try one. They smelt great, and both the texture and taste was like that of normal pastry and in the end was worth the slightly stressful preparation.

For my second attempt I made a pie which was a bit more successful, although the pastry didn’t require handling as much.

To make handling the pastry easier I tried the following:

– Placing a chopping board in the freezer for 10 minutes, this provided a nice a cold surface on which to roll the pastry out.
– Keeping the pastry in the fridge until I need to use it.
– Rolling the pastry out between sheets of greaseproof paper.
– Chilling the left over scraps of the pastry for a few minutes before re-rolling them.

These techniques did stop the pastry from melting but I still had a little trouble getting the pastry as thin as I wanted. This said, if you don’t mind a pie that looks a little rough around edges but still tastes good then I would recommend giving this pastry a try.

Overall, the fact that this pastry tastes good which for me outweighed the difficulty of working with it. I would probably buy it again, but I do think with a few changes Silly Yak could make this product even better.

Rating: 3.5/5

You can buy Silly Yak pastry at selected Tesco stores – visit www.sillyyak.co.uk for more information.